Triumph Speed Triple 2006 Rear Hub and Cush Drive Bearing Replacement

rnexussix's picture

This is my attempt at documenting Triumph Speed Triple 2006 Rear Hub and Cush Drive Bearing Replacement and Lubrication.

A disclaimer: I am NOT a motorcycle mechanic. The tools and procedures I used to remove the old bearings and insert the new ones, were a result of NOT having the proper tools and proper workspace to perform this work. If you choose to follow this example, you are may  damage  the rear hub, the new bearings , or other parts of the final drive. Finally,improper bearing installation may cause your motorcycle's rear wheel to lock up at speed and cause an accident which might  seriosly injure, or KILL you.

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Used a flat screwdriver bit to "unstake" the nut (below) . To losen the left nut, I used a foot long breaker bar, with a foot long pipe on top of it, while the bike was in gear and my friend sat on top of it stomping on the rear brake to keep the rear wheel from turning.  It was TIGT !

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I wanted to unstake and losen the  leftside nut  before lifting the motorcycle on to the stand. 

 

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Losening the right nut was much easier as I have done this several times before and made sure it was torqued to OEM spec.

 

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With both wheel nuts now only  finger tight on both sides I lifted the bike on to rear and front stands and after inverting the front pegs, placed static jacks underneath them.

 

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Close up of the inverted front pegs and the jacks underneath them.  The motorcycle is pretty stable at this point.

 

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with motorcycle on the stand and jacks I removed the right side nut , washer and spacer, ...

 

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paying attention to the beveled washer orientation ...

 

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Then I removed the rear wheel.

 

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Picture of the whole rear hub assembly with the rear brake caliper attached to the swingarm

 

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I losened and then removed the swing arm bolt  that helps to hold eccentric hub

 

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pinch bolt removed

 

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Then rotated the eccentric hub to losen the chain before removing it from the rear sprocket

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removing the chain guard (don't lose the metal insert)

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more chain guard bolts have to be removed before chain guard comes off

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With chain guard off  I removed the chain off the rear sprocket

 

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Took this opportunity to remove and replace with a new one - the chain rubbing strip that wraps around the swingarm. Note the wear on the swingarm and the rubbing strip retaining bolt.

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This is what the swingarm end looks like with the wheel, chain guard and chain removed.

 

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I took  pictures of the rear brake caliper before removing it

 

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rear brake caliper still attached to the swingarm bracket

 

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Another angle on the rear brake caliper still attached

 

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Removing 1st bolt that attaches rear brake caliper to the bracket

 

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Removing the 2nd bolt

 

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rear brake caliper detached

 

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rear brake caliper detached another angle

 

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rear brake caliper detached yet another angle

 

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What the swingarm looks like with rear brake caliper detached

 

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Time to remove the leftside nut

 

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With the nut removed I used a rubber mullet to knock the axle out of the eccentric hub

 

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axle almost out

 

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axle almost out different angle

 

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rear axle and the cush drive / sprocket assembly removed

 

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Noting the location of the spacers and washers on the cush drive and left side of the hub 

 

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Noting the location of the spacers and washers on the left side of the hub 

 

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the hub sure looks filthy

 

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Removing hub and rear brake bracket retining circlip

 

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removing the bolt which attaches rear brake bracket to the swing arm

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rear brake bracket bolt removed

 

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Rear brake bracket removed. Notice the old (brown colored) anti-seize material between bracket and the swing arm hub.

 

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To remove the eccentric hub from the swingarm I gently tapped it out with a rubber hammer

 

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It started to movea after few firm taps

 

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Another angle of the eccentric hub half way inside the swing arm

 

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eccentric hub and the rear brake bracket

 

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What the inside of the swing arm looks like with hub removed 

 

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To take aprat cush drive I simply held it in both my hands (holding the sprocket)  with the black top facing up and shook it up and down.

 

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Noting the location of the spacers / washers in the cush drive

 

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Removing the O-ring inside the cush drive that keeps it sealed from teh elements. I replaced it as well.

 

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another angle on cush drive o-ring

 

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I used a traight blade screwdriver to removethe bearing seal. Wasn't worried about damaging it as you got a new one to replace it along with a new bearing.

 

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With bearing seal removed I can see the old bearing inside the cush drive cover.

 

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New cush drive bearing and seal ready to be installed.

 

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After heating the cush drive housing cover with a propane torch I knocked the old bearing out using a hammer and a ratchet extension. without propane torch "treatment the bearing would not budge. I was very careful not to over heat the aluminum cush drive cover. With the old bearing out I cleaned teh cush drive cover and then reinserted the new bearing the bearing seal.  Which was very easy becasue:

a. I had the new bearing in the freezer the night before and took it out before inserting it in to it's place and I heated up the cush drive cover with a propane torch before I attempted to re-insert the new bearing. With the new bearing shrunken becasue it was frozen cold and the bearing hole expanded becasue I heated the cover with a propane torch, the new bearing simply fell in to place. I verified that it sunk all teh way in by striking it's OUTER race with a bronze driver and a small hammer (never ever hit bearing inner race if you don't want to destroy your new bearing).

 

 

 

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Before removing the old roller bearing, I had to remove the circlip (no eyelets) from the hub. What a PITA that was. 

 

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Eventually I have managet to lift one end of the circlip with the blade of a small screwdriver.

 

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I decided not to remove the internal circlip (which has eyelets) and knocket the old roller bearing (after heating the hub with the propane torch of course) out through the gap in the internal circlip.

I repeated the same procedure for teh double bearing on the other side of the hub.

 

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Here is what the eccentric hub looks like with both side bearings removed

 

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The other side of the eccentric hub. You can clearly see the gap in the internal circlip I mentioned earler.

 

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I removed the old bearing seals (iinternal and external) and replaced them with new ones.

 

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Other side view of the eccentric hub with both sides bearings removed 

 

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The old and the new needle roller bearigns side by side (new on the right). Note the black plastic race on the new one - right side.

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Left side dual bearings (ball ) 

 

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Warming up the hub to get it ready for dropping in the cold (frozen) new bearings.

 

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The waterproof grease I used to pack the needle roller bearing

 

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Yes, it is NLGI II spec. as required by Triumph shop manual.

 

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needle roller bearing in place and packed with grease.

 

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Before reinstalling the hub in to the swingarm I applied copper based anti-seize to the inside of the swing arm

 

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Then I pushed the blade of a screwdriver to open the swing arm a little so the hub easily slides in.

 

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Reinstalling the eccentric hub back in to place.

 

Once hub was back in place I re-assembled everything back in to place, toquing al the bolts and the nuts according to values specified in the Triumph Speed Triple service manual. Obviosly, I cleaned everything before re-greasing and reassembling the parts.

 

I used the following online resources during  my research, before attmpting this maintenance procedure:

http://www.thespeedtriple.com/forum/how/5591-rear-hub-bearing-replacement.html

http://www.bowl-of-mice.co.uk/S3_Hub.html

http://www.triumphrat.net/maintenance-tips-and-tricks-for-your-sprint/115096-please-post-step-by-step-to-lube-the-rear-wheel-bearings-2.html#post1314289

 

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Disclaimer

The content of this MotoHowTo.Com post is informational, not instructional. Improperly performed motorcycle maintenance, or repair may cause; accident, serious injury or death. If you are not a trained motorcycle mechanic, consider taking your motorcycle to a trained motorcycle mechanic, authorized dealer, or the after-market motorcycle parts installation facility.